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Path to Treaty - online submission

The purpose of this online survey is to collect your comments, opinions and ideas about a treaty or treaties. This survey is being conducted by the Queensland Government.

Please note: There is a 45-minute time limit for completing this survey from the time you start filling it out.

Fields marked with * must be completed.

1. TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT YOURSELF
D1. Do you identify as an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander Queenslander?  
D2. Age?  *
D3. Gender  *
D4. Postcode  *
D5. Are you responding personally or on behalf of an organisation?  
2. WHAT COULD BE IN A TREATY?

Although we are just beginning of the journey for the Path to Treaty, it is important to talk about what a treaty means for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Queenslanders and the broader Queensland community. Guided by the principle of self-determination, the Queensland Government won’t determine who a treaty is with or what it will be about. The Queensland Government can only agree to what is within its own Constitutional powers.

Agreements or treaties founded on mutual respect and recognition and speaking the truth about our shared history are an important way to reset the relationship and to negotiate a new way of working in partnership for the Queensland Government and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Queenslanders. We believe that a treaty will have benefits for all Queenslanders to help promote reconciliation, foster a shared pride in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture and help heal the wounds of the past.

Q1. What does treaty mean to you?  *
1000
Q2. Who needs to be involved in the path to treaty journey?  *

Q3. What would you like a treaty to achieve in Queensland?  *
1000
Q3A. What would you like to see included in a treaty in Queensland?  
1000
Q4. What needs to be done to support truth telling as part of this path to treaty?  *
1000
3. HOW HAS IT HAPPENED ELSEWHERE?

The process of treaty as a means of recognising past wrongs and reframing relationships for the future has seen progress in Canada, Finland, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden and the United States. More recently states and territories in Australia have also begun their own processes.

British Columbia in Canada provides an example of a path to treaty for a modern treaty process. The British Columbia Treaty Commission is the independent body responsible for facilitating treaty negotiations.

The British Columbia Treaty Commission and treaty negotiation process were established as a result of recommendations made by the British Columbia Claims Task Force in 1991.

The Task Force was made up of 2 representatives each from the Canadian Government, the British Columbia Government and three First Nations representatives (appointed by leaders from First Nations across British Columbia at a meeting called the First Nations Summit).

The Task Force was asked to define the scope of negotiations between the parties, the organisation and process of negotiations, including the time frames for negotiations.

Q5A1. Are there elements of treaty reform in British Columbia you think could work in Queensland?  *
Q5B1-Y. Which elements of the approach taken in British Columbia would suit the Queensland landscape.  
1000
Q5B1-N. Which elements of the approach taken in British Columbia would not suit the Queensland landscape.  
1000

In Victoria, an independent Treaty Advancement Commission has been established. The Commission’s job is to maintain the momentum of the treaty process, and set up an Aboriginal Representative Body which will work with the government to develop and agree to a treaty negotiation framework.

The Advancing the Treaty Process with Aboriginal Victorians Act 2018 sets out how the Aboriginal Representative Body and the government will work together to progress the treaty process including:

  • agreeing the treaty negotiation framework (this will set out the ‘ground rules’ for example, what is on and off the negotiating table, and who can negotiate etc.)
  • establishing a Treaty Authority which will administer the treaty negotiation framework, and be an ‘independent umpire’ to mediate future negotiation processes.
Q5A2. Are there elements of treaty reform in Victoria you think could work in Queensland?  *
Q5B2-Y. Which elements of the approach taken in Victoria would suit the Queensland landscape.  
1000
Q5B2-N. Which elements of the approach taken in Victoria would not suit the Queensland landscape.  
1000

In the Northern Territory, the Northern Territory Joint Land Councils and Northern Territory Government signed the Barunga Agreement (which is a Memorandum of Understanding) paving the way for consultations to begin with Aboriginal People about a treaty.

An independent Treaty Commissioner has been appointed to lead the consultations with Aboriginal people and organisations across the Territory, and develop a framework for treaty negotiations. Legislation is being developed to support the Commissioner’s role.

Q5A3. Are there elements of treaty reform in Northern Territory you think could work in Queensland?  *
Q5B3-Y. Which elements of the approach taken in Northern Territory would suit the Queensland landscape.  
1000
Q5B3-N. Which elements of the approach taken in Northern Territory would not suit the Queensland landscape.  
1000

In South Australia, an independent Treaty Commissioner was appointed to undertake broad consultation on a suitable framework to further treaty negotiations between the South Australian Government and Aboriginal people, and provide advice to the Minister on a framework.

Following a change of government the treaty process did not continue. There is no path to treaty in place.

Q5A4. Are there elements of treaty reform in South Australia you think could work in Queensland?  *
Q5B4-Y. Which elements of the approach taken in South Australia would suit the Queensland landscape.  
1000
Q5B4-N. Which elements of the approach taken in South Australia would not suit the Queensland landscape.  
1000
Q5A5. Are there elements of treaty reform in other locations you think could work in Queensland?  *
Q5B5-Y. Which elements of approaches taken in other locations that would suit the Queensland landscape.  
1000
Q5B5-N. Which elements of approaches taken in other locations that would not suit the Queensland landscape.  
1000
Q6. What are the key issues in establishing paths to treaty we need to consider?  
1000
4. WHAT WOULD QUEENSLAND'S PATH TO TREATY LOOK LIKE?

The development of Queensland’s Path to Treaty will be up to all and there are many things to consider such as:

  • a treaty may mean different things to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Queenslanders
  • the voices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Queenslanders in urban, regional and country towns, and remote areas need to be heard in the design of the pathway
  • supporting all Queenslanders to be part of this journey, as the Path to Treaty provides a significant opportunity to promote reconciliation for all Queenslanders
  • how to best keep momentum going on the Path to Treaty.
Q7. What are your priorities for the next steps for the path to treaty in Queensland?  
1000
Q8. How would you like to keep the conversation going about the path to treaty?  
1000
Q9. Do you want a path to treaty in Queensland?  *

10. Do you have any final thoughts you would like to share?  
1000
 
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Last updated
 18 October 2019

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